Page 1 of 1

Radiation levels in Japan

Posted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 12:58 am
by kowalskil
1) Those interested in recently (?) measured radiation levels (at different distances from the Fukushima reactors in Japan) should see:

 http://www.meti.go.jp/earthquake/nuclea ... r02_01.pdf  
(dose levels measured 1 meter above the ground)

 http://www.meti.go.jp/earthquake/nuclea ... r02_02.pdf
(dose levels measured 1 centimeter above the ground)

Note that the color code is explained near the lower left corner of each dispay. Radiation levels are expressed in micro-Sieverts per hour. [The 10 micro-sieverts, for example, is the same as 0.01 mSv, etc. And 10 micro-Sievert/hour is the same as 0.24 mSv/day, or 7.2 mSv/month.]

2) The effect of penetrating radiation on a person depends on the dose received. The common unit of dose is Sievert (Sv). Smaller doses are expressed in milliseverts (mSv) or microseveret.

A dose of 10 Sv will most likely results in death, within a day or two.
5 Sv would kill about 50% of exposed people.
2 Sv can also be fatal, especially without prompt treatment.

0.25 Sv = 250 mSv is the limit for emergency workers in life-saving operations.
0.10 Sv = 100 mSv dose is clearly linked to later cancer risks.
0.05 Sv = 50 mSv is the yearly limit for radiation workers.

0.004 Sv= 4 mSv typical yearly dose due to natural radiation (cosmic rays, etc).
0.003 Sv= 3 mSV typical dose from mammogram

Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia)
.

RE: Radiation levels in Japan

Posted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 4:21 pm
by DodgeFB
kowalskil wrote: 1) Those interested in recently (?) measured radiation levels (at different distances from the Fukushima reactors in Japan) should see:

 http://www.meti.go.jp/earthquake/nuclea ... r02_01.pdf  
(dose levels measured 1 meter above the ground)

 http://www.meti.go.jp/earthquake/nuclea ... r02_02.pdf
(dose levels measured 1 centimeter above the ground)

Note that the color code is explained near the lower left corner of each dispay. Radiation levels are expressed in micro-Sieverts per hour. [The 10 micro-sieverts, for example, is the same as 0.01 mSv, etc. And 10 micro-Sievert/hour is the same as 0.24 mSv/day, or 7.2 mSv/month.]

2) The effect of penetrating radiation on a person depends on the dose received. The common unit of dose is Sievert (Sv). Smaller doses are expressed in milliseverts (mSv) or microseveret.

A dose of 10 Sv will most likely results in death, within a day or two.
5 Sv would kill about 50% of exposed people.
2 Sv can also be fatal, especially without prompt treatment.

0.25 Sv = 250 mSv is the limit for emergency workers in life-saving operations.
0.10 Sv = 100 mSv dose is clearly linked to later cancer risks.
0.05 Sv = 50 mSv is the yearly limit for radiation workers.

0.004 Sv= 4 mSv typical yearly dose due to natural radiation (cosmic rays, etc).
0.003 Sv= 3 mSV typical dose from mammogram

Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia)
.
That is very good information. Thank you.

RE: Radiation levels in Japan

Posted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:12 am
by 1988sonya
Thanks for share information about of radiation effect in Japan. But can anyone say how to remove this Radiation Effect in Japan?

RE: Radiation levels in Japan

Posted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 8:54 pm
by appleton
Great information in regards to removing the effect there isn't no way it can be done I think. Radiation doesn't get attracted to lead does it? It only shields you from it.

The only option would be to wait thousands of years I assume. Having a nuclear engineer chime in here or maybe even the OP himself would be cool :)